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Google honors Hannah Glasse, first popular cookbook writer, with a Google doodle

Hannah Glasse, the English cookbook writer of the 18th century, is being honored today on the Google home page with her own Google doodle. The doodle shows a woman loading food into an old-fashioned oven with a book below.

Hannah Glasse was a pioneer who wrote the most popular cookbooks in her times. “The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy,” her cookbook, was published in 1747 and was printed in 40 editions, many of which were pirated. The book was written in plain English so it could be used by all types of people, no matter their education level.

Hannah Glasse was born in London 310 years ago on March 28, 1708, and passed away at the age of 62 on September 1, 1770. She had a large family. Some say she had 10 children, some say she had 11.

Google wrote:

If the thought of Yorkshire pudding and gooseberry fool makes your mouth water, you have Hannah Glasse to thank for making these two delectable dishes staples in English cuisine. Born on this day in 1708, Glasse was a pioneering English cook and author of the most popular cookbook of the 18th century. Published in 1747, The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy was unique; it was one of the first cookbooks written in a simple and conversational style, which meant that any English speaker and reader — regardless of their class — could learn how to cook.

Glasse’s cookbook was popular not only because it was easy to read, but also because of its massive scope. It included a whopping 972 recipes, covering everything from puddings and soups, to what to serve at Lent, to preparing food for the sick.

Today’s Doodle features Glasse whipping up a batch of classic Yorkshire puddings. Her recipe for Yorkshire pudding, among many others, is one of the earliest known ever published.

Happy 310th birthday, Hannah Glasse!

Illustration by Matthew Cruickshank

The post Google honors Hannah Glasse, first popular cookbook writer, with a Google doodle appeared first on Search Engine Land.

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